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Dividend Tax – Good or bad news??

It’s early March and spring is in the air. The spring flowers are coming out into bloom – our garden is filled with snowdrops and daffodils. But then again last week we couldn’t see them because of snow!  The start of spring though means not just the end of winter but also the end of one tax year and the start of another. This year, on the 6th April, though brings with it the start of a brand new tax – the dividend tax.

You may have seen lots of hype, but just what is it all about.  For many of you David or I will already have had a chat, but we wanted to put a few thoughts down on paper for you!

Let’s have a brief look at what it’s all about.

What are the changes?

Change 1 –Grossing up of dividends is scrapped (believe it or not this little change is good news)

Currently all net dividends (this is same as the cash you receive) are grossed up by 100/90 before they are taxed. The 10% difference is a tax credit which is added to reflect the fact that the company paying the dividend has already paid corporation tax.  Don’t worry if you don’t get this  what it really means for most of us is that this ‘adjustment’ has the effect of reducing how much in terms of dividends taxpayers can really earn before they go into a higher tax band.

So for many company shareholder/directors the scrapping of this rule is good news as it

  • Removes an area of tax which many tax payers find confusing as they grapple with gross and net dividends.
  • It increases how much cash dividends they can take before they fall into a higher tax band.

Change 2 – Dividend Tax (This is the bad news for most Small & Micro business owner’s)

This new tax is applied to dividend income received in a year which is more than £5,000. The two groups of taxpayers who will be affected and therefore pay more tax in 2016/17 than they did in 2015/16 are:-

  • Company directors who take a modest a salary and the rest of their income as dividends
  • Taxpayers who have sizeable share portfolios which generate sizeable amounts of income

And when is an allowance not really an allowance?

Everyone will be entitled to a £5,000 tax free dividend allowance. This sounds very generous – after all its tax free. Well it’s not generous and that’s because it’s not really an allowance it’s a new 0% tax band has been created. The net result, is that it reduces a taxpayer’s basic rate tax band.

How much more tax could I pay?

Let’s have a look at the numbers (well I am an Accountant).  This should make it easier to understand how the changes are likely to affect you!

The following table summarises the extra income tax which will be payable next year (2016/17) compared to this year (2015/16).  Or put in simple terms for any Dividends you take from 6th April 2016 onwards!

Cash Dividend 2015/16 Tax 2016/17 Tax Increase
£ £ £ £
15,000 0 455 455
30,000 0 1,655 1,655
50,000 4,777 6,920 2,143
75,000 11,027 15,045 4,018
100,000 20,843 24,615 3,772

The dividend tax is particularly punitive for the many family owned businesses where both the shares and income is split between both the husband and wife. In these cases the tax increases (as shown above) are doubled.  So now coupled with increased operating costs in your business as a result of Auto Enrolment and the National Living Wage you can see why I am concerned that this is all too much for many small business owners.  2016 is the year of going backwards for many business owners’ in terms of PROFITABILITY unless they act now!

When will I be paying the extra tax for 2016/17?

Under the usual self-assessment rules then this extra tax would be payable in one lump sum payment by 31/1/2018. That gives taxpayers time to put some money aside each month and can budget accordingly.

It appears though that HMRC doesn’t want to wait that long for the extra tax. We understand that HMRC is in the process of amending tax codes for many company directors so that the lower ‘new’ code reflects the estimated amount of tax due on dividend income.

If you are a taxpayer where cashflow is challenging then this change will be bad news as you will be required an extra monthly tax payment to HMRC potentially as early as May this year. This doesn’t give much time to plan and budget.

How will it work?

Every taxpayer is notified of their tax code via a P2 (PAYE coding notice) and those affected the estimated amount of dividend tax will be shown within the notes.

Tip: If you get one of these tax coding notices it’s advisable to check the figures – an incorrect tax code could mean you unwittingly pay way too much or too little tax.

If you are unsure that the code is correct get in touch with your accountant.

What Can I do?

Everyone’s situation is different which I’m afraid mean the possible tax saving options that are available will also be different. That said here are a few ideas:-

Maximise the annual tax free dividend allowance

Everyone is entitled to the new £5,000 allowance. Married couples can spread their share portfolios in order to spread their dividend income and thereby use the whole of their allowance.

Use an ISA

ISA dividends are tax free and will be not be subject to the new dividend tax. You can transfer up to £15,240 worth of shares and investments into ISAs this year.

Maximise a spouse’s income tax allowance and tax band

Married couples should use the whole of their personal allowances and basic rate tax bands, where applicable, so that any dividends that paid to the spouse who pays the lowest rate of tax.

Invest in VCTs

VCT (Venture Capital Trust) are for taxpayers who are willing to take higher risks. Exactly like ISAs VCTs will give a taxpayer tax free dividends. Also like ISAs when the investment is sold the gain or profit is also tax free as it’s not subject to Capital Gains Tax.

 

Kim  KMA Accountancy

 

 

Disclaimer
This article is for general information only and no action should be taken, or refrained from, as a result of this information. Professional advice should be taken based on specific circumstances in each individual case. Whilst we endeavor to ensure that the information contained in this article is correct, no liability will be accepted by KMA Accountancy for damages of any kind arising from the contents of this communication, or for any action or decision taken as a result of using any such information.

The Beauty of a well Designed and Executed Process

Whilst consulting down in London for a client, I pop out quite frequently for lunch at a small local Cafe / ‘Wrap- bar’.  The establishment is only about 8.5 square metres in size, and customers queue outside in long lines sometimes to get served.  Obviously the wraps they serve up at lunch time are very good, but it the process that the proprietor has established, that has struck me as so novel.

image
Bearing in mind that quite a few processes are running concurrently, namely a O2C (Order to Cash), the actual operation (making of the wraps from scratch) and a Customer Service interface, all run by the owner and two assistants, this is a study in efficiency in 5 minutes or less.
Bearing in mind that other fast food outlets have a small army of people floating about in the ‘back-of-house’ kitchen area, you can walk in an out and get a meal delivered to you in exactly the same time as a much more ‘industrial-scale’ operation.
The only way this is possible is because the proprietor has put his customer front and centre of his operation.  He even customises the experience, by remembering who order what and personally handing the warmed up wrap to the person who ordered it, with a big smile and a ‘have a nice day’ or similar greeting.
success
The design process, in looking at each step in the multi-layered process, and the execution of the process is flawless and a very useful example of how any business or customer interface process can be made a simple and efficient as possible.
Have you recently considered the ‘Customer journey’ and “Customer-centricity” of your operation, whether it is external or internal customers? If not, try it, even if it is only a ‘mind-exercise’, to see if you can potentially identify process savings that will lead to the business principle of ‘making it easy to do business with‘.
HassleFree
@3resource – ©2015
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FRS105 – The new Financial Reporting Standard for Small Entities (in draft) – (aka – FRED58 at present)

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) has recently published FRED 58, being the Exposure Draft for FRS105, which in turn will become the new FRSSE (or replace the existing FRSSE, we believe).

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Comments on the Exposure Draft was due by 30 April 2015, so if you missed it, we are afraid the the train has already left the station.

In a nutshell, we have some serious conceptual and philosophical concerns the FRED 58 does not address (and staff at the FRC at a recent event in London, prior to the General Election, could not provide assurances on).

image

Effectively FRS 105 (as it will be know), once it is ratified and adopted in parliament, will not be IFRS ‘Lite-lite‘, although it will have some of the overall principles of Fair Value Accounting contained within it.

At a fundamental level micro-entities (* as defined below) can choose to adopt either FRS 105 or FRS 102. However, be very careful in which one you choose, as the two standards have some fundamental differences contained within them, which, later down the line (as the proverbial can is kicked up the road), might cost you additional compliance fees and time and effort, if you need to convert from FRS 105 reporting to FRS 102 (New UK GAAP).

Our concern is this:

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“The overall objective of all the initiatives (driven from Brussels) is HARMONISATION. The differences in approach between FRS 105 and FRS 102 do not underscore this fundamental principle!”

Hence, our health warning:

Think and consult carefully, before adopting either standard (FRS 102 or FRS 105) if you are a micro-entity caught in the compliance reporting net.

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If you have any questions or concerns, please contact any Business Accountant in our network for more details.

3resource ©2015

*Definition of a micro-entity:

Micro-entities – HMRC guidance – May 2015 (as per the HMRC web site at the post’s publishing date)

Micro-entities are very small companies. Your company will be a micro-entity if it has any 2 of the following:

a turnover of £632,000 or less
£316,000 or less on its balance sheet
10 employees or less
If your company is a micro-entity, you can:

prepare simpler accounts that meet statutory minimum requirements
send only your balance sheet with less information to Companies House
benefit from the same exemptions available to small companies

R&D – impact on director remuneration

It’s generally more tax efficient for a director shareholder to extract the majority of profit from a company as dividends rather than salary. But what if the company is undertaking R&D? Is this still the optimum remuneration strategy?

Example

You are the sole director in a company that undertakes some R&D.  The annual profit is estimated at £140,000 for the year ended 31 March 2016 before taking into account the director’s remuneration.

You might think that the most tax-efficient remuneration package is £10,600 for 2015/16 to cover the personal allowance and then net dividends of £28,606 to take the director up to the basic rate band. You also need to consider whether the company can make an R&D relief claim and, if it can, how this might affect your decision.

Salary vs Dividends

If the director takes a typical remuneration package, then the net tax and NI savings over taking a salary of £39,206 would be £5,265, assuming the £2,000 employment allowance is available.  This saving is made because dividends received within the basic rate band attract no further income tax plus no NI for the director or the company. This more than outweighs the additional corporation tax suffered on profits retained for dividends.

Taking R&D relief into account

From 1 April 2015 the R&D tax credit for SMEs increased from 225% to 230%.  There is no R&D uplift on dividends received – only on salary. This means that paying a £39,206 salary would actually result in a saving over taking a small salary and dividends of £1,208.

What about a larger salary? In fact, if the client wanted to take out more than the basic rate band, then the salary may become even more tax efficient.  A £70,000 salary would result in net tax/NI due of £1,366 after the R&D relief (assuming there was sufficient profit to offset the CT relief), whereas a salary of £10,600 and net dividends of £59,400 would result in net tax/NI of £5,883 – so the saving by taking a salary over dividends is £4,517.

HMRC will generally not accept 100% of a director’s salary costs within the R&D claim unless it can be clearly demonstrated that the director was exclusively involved in R&D activity.

Pension contributions

While dividends don’t qualify as eligible staff costs for R&D claims, company pension contributions do.  New pension freedoms make pension contributions a much more attractive option, so you might want to consider this as part of your remuneration package.

If a company makes pension contributions of £40,000 for the director and they spend 60% of their time on R&D, the R&D relief on this will be £55,200 (£40,000 x 60% x 230%). This means that the overall CT saving on the pension contribution will be £14,240 (((£40,000 x 40%) + £55,200) x 20%). As there’s no NI due on pension contributions, this is an even more efficient option than taking additional salary.

The default response of a dividend being more tax efficient than salary may not be applicable if the director undertakes R&D work for the company as there’s no R&D uplift on dividends. So it’s vital to crunch the numbers before agreeing the most tax-efficient remuneration strategy.

Get the best deal for yourself

For advice on the best split between salary and dividends or help with setting up a limited company and registering for VAT, please contact Alterledger.

Hobby Trading Losses

You might think you have a business, but HMRC can disagree with you.  If HMRC considers that you are never going to make a profit, they will also refuse any loss relief.

Losses and profits

You might think that HMRC is being unfair in refusing loss relief, but if your activity is a hobby you won’t have to pay tax on profits either.  This rule can be tricky as revealed in the case of P, when  HMRC dismissed his claim for loss relief.

Trade or personal loss?

HMRC challenged P’s claim at a tribunal because in its view it related to non-business transactions and so was a personal financial loss and not one arising from a trade. Non-trading losses can’t be set against taxable income and it’s not just HMRC being difficult.

Trading tests

HMRC and tax specialists refer to the so-called “badges of trade” to decide if a trade exists. These tests were set out in a court judgment decades ago, but remain valid today. One of the tests to establish if a trade exists is that there must be an intention to make profit from a business. In P’s case the tribunal extended this test a little further.

Incapable of making a profit

P started two “businesses”, neither of which made a profit because, in the tribunal’s view, he was inexperienced and couldn’t devote enough time to them. Neither venture was capable of making a profit without P reducing the hours he spent in his main job. In essence P didn’t have the business acumen or time to devote to making his business profitable.

Putting the boot on the other foot

The ruling in P’s case is useful, not just for guidance on when losses are deductible, but for countering HMRC if it claims money you make from a hobby is taxable. Its view has always been that if you advertise your hobby in a newspaper or online you’re probably trading. But the tribunal’s judgment, supported by HMRC, dispelled that idea. If you don’t have the time or intention to carry on a trade, profit you make from isolated sales isn’t liable to income tax.

Turn your hobby into a business

For advice on converting your hobby to a profitable business, including help with setting up a limited company or registering for VAT, please contact Alterledger.

VAT for sole trader start-ups

How to maximise your VAT reclaim

As any new business knows, you can incur significant costs at the outset before you get any income.  Most of these start-up costs will have VAT included and if you plan properly you should be able to recover this VAT as long as you are planning to make taxable supplies.

Save pounds on VAT

Plan ahead and reclaim everything

If you are setting up a business and can ahead, you can register for VAT from the date your business will start.  For most traders there is not any restriction on the date the business can start, but for some professional services eg barristers and advocates, no trade exists until they qualify.  To maximise the VAT to be reclaimed, the sole trader can register for VAT in advance of date of commencement, effective the date they are due to qualify.  This means that the VAT registration will be in place from the 1st day of trading and all sales invoices can be issued as VAT invoices.

Pre-registration VAT

There are specific rules allowing pre-registration VAT to be reclaimed, but any claims to recover pre-registration VAT must relate to the same trade and made by the same person.  A sole trader who incorporates the business is not the same legal person as the new company.  Any VAT suffered by the (unregistered) sole trader can’t be claimed as pre-registration VAT by the new company.

Get help with registering

Your accountant will be able to register you for VAT and recommend the best scheme for you.  It can take a few weeks for HMRC to process applications, but accountants who are registered as agents with HMRC are likely to have a quicker turnaround time.  For advice on registering for VAT and setting up your invoices, please visit the Alterledger website.

Why working with accounting is about to get so much better

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Anyone who works with businesses is fully aware of how important accounting is for the success of a company. Yet many business owners have a negative attitude towards accounting. A high percentage of entrepreneurs see accounting as a necessary evil and often a hindrance to starting a new company.

How is that possible? Wasn’t accounting invented to help companies manage their business?

The IT industry has brought us computers and the ability to create software to automate bookkeeping. While there is no doubt that accounting software has been a great help, when we look at the usage of it, something is wrong. More than half of the businesses in the UK keep track of their finances by using a combination of spreadsheets and word processors rather than using accounting software. In an age where computing power is ubiquitous and virtually never too far from our pocket, we should be able to do better than this.

In 2013, international accounting software provider e-conomic was considering what its next generation accounting software should look like. And decided to take a different approach. What would happen if we created a piece of accounting software for people who had no knowledge of accounting? And what if we made the basic functions free for people to use? We hoped that it would make accounting approachable by virtually anybody.

That’s how the Debitoor invoicing and accounting software was born.

Introducing simple accounting to the world

Today, more than 33,000 people in the UK and almost 300,000 people worldwide have signed up for Debitoor and have given us the privilege of approaching accounting in a different way. Debitoor is used in more than 30 countries, from the UK to South Africa, from Colombia to Australia and New Zealand.

Debitoor is an accounting package for very small businesses. It allows them to manage their customers, create quotes and invoices. It allows them to register their purchases, deal with bank and payments and helps them report their VAT directly to HMRC at the click of a button. Debitoor helps those small companies manage their assets and keep track of what’s on their balance sheet in a very simple manner. Finally, Debitoor helps business owners collaborate with their accountants by allowing them to share their data with them.

Debitoor’s mission is to make accounting cool to work with. Two years after we started, the typical reaction we get from accountants is: “Wow, convincing my clients to use this is going to be super easy!”. We have captured the essence of Debitoor in this video.

Letting users shape accounting software

But what have we done to make this possible? The most important ingredient has been a clear focus. Our mission has always been to make accounting easy for small business owners who know very little about accounting.

Here are some of the key principles we followed to build the Debitoor invoicing and accounting software:
Approachable: We have removed any obstacles to getting started. There is no setup needed, we do not ask questions, users can start on the free package, the program is ready to go.
Natural: We have eliminated all technical lingo. You will not find the words “debit” and “credit” in Debitoor. The workflows in the program follow the natural flows of a user with no accounting knowledge and the program uses the typical words he’d use.
Forgiving: People make mistakes; and accounting systems typically make it quite complicated to correct mistakes. In Debitoor, actions can be undone and mistakes can easily be corrected.
Instructive: We assume people do not know much about accounting, so we have structured the entire program to let users learn along the way. This is not just functionality but it encompasses the entire packaging of the product.
User-driven: In an open forum, users can give their feedback and suggest new features, vote for their own or others’ suggestions and influence the further development of the software. This transparency is super important for us to develop a truly user-driven program.
Collaborative: Most of our users share their data with their accountants in order to get help with taxes, reporting and ensuring quality.

We also had the privilege of building the product with the technology which was available in 2013. This has huge benefits for our users because it allows us to provide them with a service which is reliable, improving at a fast pace and very secure. Having a modern architecture also ensures that Debitoor is very easy to connect to other popular cloud services.

Debitoor’s user base is very diverse as its appeal is quite broad. Many of our users are freelancers, artists, consultants, designers or other creative people, but we have also small artisans and shop keepers or owners of clinics and small distributors. They all have missions and purposes in their lives and we try to help them with their accounting.

Check out the stories of Felicia Matheson from Prohibition Drinks in Newscastle, Northern Ireland and the story of Esther from The Roasting Shed in London.

Changing how an industry works

As with any change in technology, this brings great opportunities to the industry it affects. The introduction of new technology, however, takes a bit of time to mature. When television started to gain mass adoption in the 1950s, broadcasters used it as it was radio. The first shows had older men with glasses reading papers in front of a microphone. This was how it used to be with radio programs.

The availability of cloud software has created a set of providers who simply made traditional accounting software available on the internet. This, we believe, will change and we will see more and more software which is transformational in nature. That is what we are trying to do with Debitoor.

We are only at the beginning of this journey. The roadmap for Debitoor will focus on three main aspects:

1. Continue to add simple flows to support what today are very difficult accounting scenarios
2. Introduce more and more automation and intelligence to enable our users to do more with less knowledge
3. Strengthen the collaboration between users and their accountants by facilitating the sharing of data between them.

What will this mean for accountants and the accounting industry? This is what our users are telling us: They love doing their invoices and keeping track of their costs in Debitoor. It gives the nice feeling of being in control, it keeps them organized and allows them to focus on their business going forward.

At the same time, they also tell us that they need help from their accountants. They need help with taxes, they need help with reporting to authorities and a lot of them need a quality check from the experts. In addition, most of them need legal and financial advice on ad hoc issues they encounter in their life as entrepreneurs.

The biggest change for accountants is to be prepared to embrace the possibilities that technology gives us. Things like cloud storage and online applications will substitute manual processes, paper and data disks. Everything is now available via a web browser on your computer or on your phone.

In order to be successful, accountants will have focus on services that draw on their knowledge and experience and they will need to be prepared to serve their customers as they move towards those new technologies.

Increased access will not be limited to technology but also to services. This will also mean increased competition. The best thing an accountant can do is embrace change and be ahead of the curve, start small but start early. The customers are already going there.

 

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