Business Accountant

Home » Posts tagged 'Funding'

Tag Archives: Funding

Is my Grant Capital or Revenue?

??????????????????????

A grant is an amount of money given to an individual or business for a specific project or purpose.

You can apply for a grant from the government, the European Union, local councils and charities.

Advantages include:

  • you won’t have to pay a grant back or pay interest on it
  • you won’t lose any control over your business

Financial assistance in the form of grants is subject to the normal taxation rules, as supplemented by S105 Income Tax (Trading and Other Income) Act 2005 and S102 Corporation Tax Act 2009 (see BIM40465). Under normal rules the tax treatment of grants will depend on whether they are capital or revenue.

Revenue grants

Grants which meet revenue expenditure, such as interest payable, are normally trading receipts.

See also Smart v Lincolnshire Sugar Co. Ltd [1937] 20TC643 and Burman v Thorn Domestic Appliances (Electrical) Ltd [1981] 55TC493.

Capital grants

Grants which meet capital expenditure are normally not trading receipts.

Grants that may be capital in nature include those paid to acquire capital assets or to facilitate the cessation of a trade or part of a trade.

See The Seaham Harbour Dock Co. v Crook [1931] 16TC333).

A capital grant reduces any qualifying capital expenditure for capital allowance purposes, see CA14100.

See BIM40451 for more details

The Accounting Rules are set out in section 24 of FRS102, neatly explained by Steve Collings in his blog, click here to read it

steve@bicknells.net

Government help to get new businesses started

Entrepreneur startup business model

The New Enterprise Allowance can provide money and support to help people start their own business if they get certain benefits and have a business idea that could work.

The scheme has resulted in:

  • around 460 new businesses being set up each week – around 53,000 in total
  • 12,360 businesses being started by people aged 50 or over
  • 10,040 disabled people becoming their own boss
  • 3,920 started by young people

People who don’t qualify for the scheme may be able to get other help with setting up a business.

Business Mentors have a key role to play

The New Enterprise Allowance is available to:

  • people over 18 who are claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • lone parents on Income Support
  • people on Employment and Support Allowance in the work-related activity group

People on the scheme get expert help and advice from a business mentor who will help them to develop their business idea and write a business plan. If the business plan is approved, they are eligible for financial support payable through a weekly allowance over 26 weeks up to a total of £1,274.

There are also Start Up Loans

A government funded scheme to provide advice, business loans and mentoring to startup businesses

steve@bicknells.net

Would you borrow from PayPal?

CASH ICON

The PayPal Working Capital fund will be trialled in the UK this autumn, with a more extensive rollout scheduled for 2015. Merchants (including eBay sellers) will be able to repay their advance with a share of their PayPal sales via card payments.

PayPal Working Capital is a loan of a fixed amount, with a single fixed fee. There are no due dates, minimum monthly payments, periodic interest charges, late fees, pre-payment fees, penalty fees, or any other fees. When you apply, simply select the amount you want — up to the maximum you qualify for. You choose the percentage of your sales that will be deducted from your PayPal account. (Deductions are made the day following each day of sales.) You’ll pay this percentage of your sales until your balance is repaid in full. You only make payments when you get paid.

PayPal Working Capital state that Working Capital offers major advantages compared with traditional ways of funding a business:

Funding in minutes – PayPal’s strong relationship with its business customers means we can approve an advance based on their PayPal sales history. This means the customer completes a quick online application – there’s no need to spend hours gathering information about their business. And PayPal can make a decision and provide the funds in minutes.

Pay when you get paid – Unlike traditional bank loans, PayPal Working Capital allows a business to repay the advance with a share of their PayPal sales. If they have a day without any PayPal sales that’s fine – they don’t repay anything that day.

No credit check – PayPal Working Capital is a merchant cash advance against future sales – it’s not a loan – so no credit checks are needed and the advance does not impact on the customer’s business or personal credit record. There is a single, fixed fee that is displayed to the customer before they sign up. There are no interest charges or late payment fees.

Is this something your business will be able to use? or want to use?

steve@bicknells.net

SMEs reluctant to borrow…

Image

High growth small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are reluctant to seek finance from banks to fund growth, a study by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS) has found.

The study found that high growth SMEs are “highly reluctant borrowers” because of their lack of trust in banks. Many firms also said they were unwilling to sacrifice their autonomy in order to access bank finance.

The study also found that high growth SMEs:

  • are 9% more likely to seek bank finance than other SMEs but are no more or less likely to receive it
  • prefer bank finance to equity finance
  • are likely to use a ‘mixed cocktail’ of finance, including internal resources and debt.

The report, Funding issues confronting high growth SMEs in the UK, was launched to study the demand for finance among high growth SMEs and investigate the problems they encountered.

It focuses specifically on high growth SMEs because of their capacity for growth and employment.

To read more about the recommendations to increase the liquidity to SMEs http://www.grant-jonesaccountancy.com/news-item/smes-reluctant-borrow

Fiona@grant-jonesaccountancy.com

%d bloggers like this: